Starter Relay vs. Solenoid: What’s the Difference (Updated)

In this article we are comparing starter relay vs. solenoid to see the differences.

You are wrong if you think a starter relay and a starter solenoid are the same.

Yes, we can say there are some similarities between the two like they both use electromagnetism to work or have coil winding, but that does not mean they are the same. The off-roaders who own winches should know the difference between the two.

The difference between a starter relay and a starter solenoid switch is explained in this article.

First, let’s start this article with the meaning of both starter relay and starter solenoid.

Also check: Good winch solenoid

Starter Relay vs. Solenoid (Meaning)

What is a Relay?

A transfer is an electromechanical switch in a vehicle that permits a low power sign to control a more powerful circuit or numerous circuits constrained by a solitary sign.

Strong state transfers have no moving parts and use semiconductors to control the power stream. Magnets are utilized in electromagnetic transfers to truly open and close a switch.

What is a Solenoids

Solenoids are intended to switch a bigger current from a distance. Like the more modest electromechanical 3D shape transfers, a loop creates an attractive field, successfully opening or shutting the circuit when power is gone through it.

Starter Relay vs. Solenoid

Size

When these two machines are placed next to each other, the first thing that stands out is their size. The starter relay is much smaller than the heavier-duty solenoid; whether the solenoid is from a winch or a car’s starter solenoid is true.

Functions

The starter solenoid is responsible for associating the starter engine and the flywheel. It does as such by pushing out the pinion and connecting with the flywheel, which then, at that point, turns over the motor.

A starter relay does not cause any movement. The switch contacts close & are the only moving parts, and it could be conceived as a simple switch in the whole ignition process.

The starter motor and flywheel are controlled by mechanical movements generated by a starter solenoid. It doesn’t make any difference and just connects the working elements of the motor to the engine flywheel.

On the other hand, the starting relay is used as a switch. It transfers the little current from the start circuit to the starter solenoid and engine, controlled by an extensively higher current from the battery.

Similarly, the hand-off capacities are a remote switch or connection between the start key controlling everything and the starter framework.

It transfers the little current from the start circuit to the starter solenoid and engine, controlled by an extensively higher current from the battery. Similarly, the hand-off capacities are a remote switch or connection between the start key controlling everything and the starter framework.

Operation

An electromagnetic force is formed when current runs through the solenoid’s coil winding. The moveable steel core is propelled outward by force. This action activates the pinion gear, which engages the flywheel’s corresponding gears.

Whenever the start circuit is started in a hand-off, a minuscule current streams, making an extensively greater current move through the transfer’s curl.

The center is drawn in by the electromagnetic power produced by the current in the curl, making it pull the armature. When the armature is pulled, the contacts shut, completing the circuit. As a result, the starting relay is nothing more than a switch.

Placement

The solenoid in a vehicle’s starting system’s function activates and starts the motor. This is why the solenoid is usually located close to the motor housing. The starter solenoid is frequently found next to or on top of the motor.

The location of the starter relay is determined by the type or model of the vehicle. It could be in the power or fuse box, under the dash, in the fuse panel, or in the right fender.

Of course, it could also be found under the hood. The relay is frequently mounted on the driver’s side of the vehicle.

Also check: Winch Contactor vs. Solenoid

Conclusion

After knowing so much about Starter relay vs. solenoid, you must have understood the difference between the two.

The starter relay is a component of a vehicle’s or other machine’s starting system that requires high-current circuits. It serves as a motor switch, whereas the solenoid is both a switch and an actuator.

Note: As an Amazon Associate, I earn commission from qualifying purchases at no cost to you.

Photo of author

CEO & Head Author

Author

Edward

Edward is an Off-Road enthusiast who wants to help other enthusiasts use the power of information to find, compare and buy the winch product that is right for them.